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The Travel Chronicles: 48 Hours in Stockholm

Considering that the entire nation of Sweden has less than 10 million inhabitants – less than the population of London – it’s given a great deal to the world, from pickled herring and lingonberry sauce, to minimalism and of course, the musical stylings of Abba. Its cosmopolitan capital, Stockholm, has a heritage rich in art and design and an internationally renowned culinary scene. Add to that an architectural legacy that encompasses old-world European charm as well as the slick, 21st-century modernism that’s become a hallmark of Scandinavian design and it’s little wonder that Stockholm has long been a favourite destination for us here at Luca Faloni.

In fact, it’s such a firm favourite, we’ve decided to put some roots down here. To celebrate the opening of our latest international outpost at Sturegallerian, we put together a list of some of our top local haunts to check out, should you find yourself in town for a long weekend.

Considering that the entire nation of Sweden has less than 10 million inhabitants – less than the population of London – it’s given a great deal to the world, from pickled herring and lingonberry sauce, to minimalism and of course, the musical stylings of Abba. Its cosmopolitan capital, Stockholm, has a heritage rich in art and design and an internationally renowned culinary scene. Add to that an architectural legacy that encompasses old-world European charm as well as the slick, 21st-century modernism that’s become a hallmark of Scandinavian design and it’s little wonder that Stockholm has long been a favourite destination for us here at Luca Faloni.

In fact, it’s such a firm favourite, we’ve decided to put some roots down here. To celebrate the opening of our latest international outpost at Sturegallerian, we put together a list of some of our top local haunts to check out, should you find yourself in town for a long weekend.

The reception and library at Ett Hem

Ett Hem, Sköldungagatan 2, 114 27

The Hotel: Ett Hem

Literally meaning ‘A Home’ in Swedish, Ett Hem is hands down, one of the most unique places to stay in Stockholm – or anywhere in the world, for that matter. As the name suggests, the owner, Jeanette Mix, wanted Ett Hem to feel less like an establishment and more like a home by creating the sort of atmosphere you’d only experience when staying at the residence of a close friend. The townhouse hotel, which dates from 1910, only has 12 rooms, each with its own personality and selection of handmade furniture, antiques and art. As a guest, you’re free to walk into the kitchen at any time and chat with the chefs about the meal they are preparing, and you can even lend them a hand to design your dream dinner. You’re also encouraged to linger in the public rooms that include a library, a living room and a conservatory, where an impressive Swedish smorgasbord is served each morning for breakfast. The only downside of this place for us, is that checkout hour always comes too soon.


The Restaurant: Prinsen

A grand dame of the Stockholm dining scene, Prinsen has been serving up traditional Nordic fare with a touch of French flair to discerning clientele since 1897. The wood-panelled interior, vintage photographs and Edwardian furnishings preserve its little-changed, Belle Époque feel and makes it a refreshing alternative to the city’s slick, minimalist venues if your taste in interiors – and food – errs more on the traditional side. Menu classics include toasted open sandwiches with shrimp, herring smorgasbords and of course, meatballs served with lingonberry sauce – it doesn’t get more authentic than this. For those looking to put some hair on their chest, sampling the restaurant’s selection of Aquavit – Sweden’s answer to schnapps – is a must, but be warned, it packs quite a punch.

Public Kitchen at the Public Hotel

Prinsen, Mäster Samuelsgatan 4, 111 44 Stockholm


The sky-high bar at Himlen

Himlen, Götgatan 78, 118 30 Stockholm

The Bar: Hemlin

One of Stockholm’s leading high-altitude drinking dens, this bar and grill can be found on the 26th floor of a 1960s former office tower in the city’s ultra-hip Södermalm district, so you definitely need a head for heights. For those willing to make the journey skywards, the reward is in the 360-degree view of the city scape, where everything from Stockholm’s green spaces to elegant church spires and the Ericsson Globe – the world’s largest spherical building – can be viewed in full panoramic glory. Cocktails are the speciality here and the menu ranges from potent classics to inventive contemporary libations. We’d suggest heading up at cocktail hour to watch the sunset over the city, or if you’re a night owl, for a post-dinner night cap (or two).

 


The Exhibition: Homage to Humanity

Forografiska is one of the world’s leading photographic museums, with branches in London, New York, Tallinn and Stockholm, showing inspiring and original exhibits that regularly change. Currently in residence in Stockholm, is Homage to Humanity, a showcase of Dutch-British photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work documenting indigenous cultures around the planet in the face of a rapidly globalising society. But it’s more than just a static exhibition – each photo and portrait on display is also a film, which viewers can experience via an app on their smartphone. Each video immerses the viewer in the world depicted in the image, whether that’s feeling the ground vibrate beneath your feet while witnessing a tribal dance or seeing the Dolgan tribe’s reindeer sprinting across melting ice in Russia’s hinterland. Anyone interested in the art of photography and ethnographic studies shouldn’t miss this.

 

Homage to Humanity exhibit

Fotografiska, Stadsgårdshamnen 22, 116 45 Stockholm


Vaxholm Fortress, Stockholm archipelago

The Day Trip: Stockholm's Island Archipelago

  • Stockholm is the gateway to the second largest archipelago in the Baltic sea, which extends 37 miles to the east of the city and is made up of more than 30,000 islands. Some of those closer to the city are ideal to escape to if you’re in search of your own Swedish idyll. A regular commuter ferry from Stockholm takes you to Fjäderholmarna Island in 20 minutes, which has an abundance of artists’ studios, so there’s plenty of handcrafted goods on offer, from art to ceramics and glass. A little further out is the fairy tale-like island of Vaxön, with its 16th-century island fortress and quaint winding streets in the main town of Vaxholm, it’s a history buff’s dream. If you’re a keen swimmer, then a trip to Grinda Island should be on the agenda. It’s popular with Stockholmers seeking sun and sea in the summer months and the local authority limits development to ensure it remains unspoilt. Whatever your interests, with so many islands to choose from, you certainly won’t be hard up for options.

The reception and library at Ett Hem

The Hotel: Ett Hem

Literally meaning ‘A Home’ in Swedish, Ett Hem is hands down, one of the most unique places to stay in Stockholm – or anywhere in the world, for that matter. As the name suggests, the owner, Jeanette Mix, wanted Ett Hem to feel less like an establishment and more like a home by creating the sort of atmosphere you’d only experience when staying at the residence of a close friend. The townhouse hotel, which dates from 1910, only has 12 rooms, each with its own personality and selection of handmade furniture, antiques and art. As a guest, you’re free to walk into the kitchen at any time and chat with the chefs about the meal they are preparing, and you can even lend them a hand to design your dream dinner. You’re also encouraged to linger in the public rooms that include a library, a living room and a conservatory, where an impressive Swedish smorgasbord is served each morning for breakfast. The only downside of this place for us, is that checkout hour always comes too soon.

Ett Hem, Sköldungagatan 2, 114 27

The reception and library at Ett Hem

Ett Hem, Sköldungagatan 2, 114 27


The Restaurant: Prinsen

A grand dame of the Stockholm dining scene, Prinsen has been serving up traditional Nordic fare with a touch of French flair to discerning clientele since 1897. The wood-panelled interior, vintage photographs and Edwardian furnishings preserve its little-changed, Belle Époque feel and makes it a refreshing alternative to the city’s slick, minimalist venues if your taste in interiors – and food – errs more on the traditional side. Menu classics include toasted open sandwiches with shrimp, herring smorgasbords and of course, meatballs served with lingonberry sauce – it doesn’t get more authentic than this. For those looking to put some hair on their chest, sampling the restaurant’s selection of Aquavit – Sweden’s answer to schnapps – is a must, but be warned, it packs quite a punch.

Prinsen, Mäster Samuelsgatan 4, 111 44 Stockholm

The atmospheric interior at Prinsen

The sky-high bar at Himlen

The Bar: Hemlin

One of Stockholm’s leading high-altitude drinking dens, this bar and grill can be found on the 26th floor of a 1960s former office tower in the city’s ultra-hip Södermalm district, so you definitely need a head for heights. For those willing to make the journey skywards, the reward is in the 360-degree view of the city scape, where everything from Stockholm’s green spaces to elegant church spires and the Ericsson Globe – the world’s largest spherical building – can be viewed in full panoramic glory. Cocktails are the speciality here and the menu ranges from potent classics to inventive contemporary libations. We’d suggest heading up at cocktail hour to watch the sunset over the city, or if you’re a night owl, for a post-dinner night cap (or two).

Himlen, Götgatan 78, 118 30 Stockholm


Luca Faloni - Island Adventures

The Bar: Hemlin

One of Stockholm’s leading high-altitude drinking dens, this bar and grill can be found on the 26th floor of a 1960s former office tower in the city’s ultra-hip Södermalm district, so you definitely need a head for heights. For those willing to make the journey skywards, the reward is in the 360-degree view of the city scape, where everything from Stockholm’s green spaces to elegant church spires and the Ericsson Globe – the world’s largest spherical building – can be viewed in full panoramic glory. Cocktails are the speciality here and the menu ranges from potent classics to inventive contemporary libations. We’d suggest heading up at cocktail hour to watch the sunset over the city, or if you’re a night owl, for a post-dinner night cap (or two).

Himlen, Götgatan 78, 118 30 Stockholm

The sky-high bar at Himlen

The Exhibition: Homage to Humanity

Forografiska is one of the world’s leading photographic museums, with branches in London, New York, Tallinn and Stockholm, showing inspiring and original exhibits that regularly change. Currently in residence in Stockholm, is Homage to Humanity, a showcase of Dutch-British photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work documenting indigenous cultures around the planet in the face of a rapidly globalising society. But it’s more than just a static exhibition – each photo and portrait on display is also a film, which viewers can experience via an app on their smartphone. Each video immerses the viewer in the world depicted in the image, whether that’s feeling the ground vibrate beneath your feet while witnessing a tribal dance or seeing the Dolgan tribe’s reindeer sprinting across melting ice in Russia’s hinterland. Anyone interested in the art of photography and ethnographic studies shouldn’t miss this.

Fotografiska, Stadsgårdshamnen 22, 116 45 Stockholm

Vintage photos on display at the Apollo’s Muse exhibition
Homage to Humanity exhibit

The Day Trip: Stockholm's Island Archipelago

Vaxholm Fortress, Stockholm archipelago

The Day Trip: Stockholm's Island Archipelago

  • Stockholm is the gateway to the second largest archipelago in the Baltic sea, which extends 37 miles to the east of the city and is made up of more than 30,000 islands. Some of those closer to the city are ideal to escape to if you’re in search of your own Swedish idyll. A regular commuter ferry from Stockholm takes you to Fjäderholmarna Island in 20 minutes, which has an abundance of artists’ studios, so there’s plenty of handcrafted goods on offer, from art to ceramics and glass. A little further out is the fairy tale-like island of Vaxön, with its 16th-century island fortress and quaint winding streets in the main town of Vaxholm, it’s a history buff’s dream. If you’re a keen swimmer, then a trip to Grinda Island should be on the agenda. It’s popular with Stockholmers seeking sun and sea in the summer months and the local authority limits development to ensure it remains unspoilt. Whatever your interests, with so many islands to choose from, you certainly won’t be hard up for options.
Luca Faloni - Island Adventures
  • Stockholm is the gateway to the second largest archipelago in the Baltic sea, which extends 37 miles to the east of the city and is made up of more than 30,000 islands. Some of those closer to the city are ideal to escape to if you’re in search of your own Swedish idyll. A regular commuter ferry from Stockholm takes you to Fjäderholmarna Island in 20 minutes, which has an abundance of artists’ studios, so there’s plenty of handcrafted goods on offer, from art to ceramics and glass. A little further out is the fairy tale-like island of Vaxön, with its 16th-century island fortress and quaint winding streets in the main town of Vaxholm, it’s a history buff’s dream. If you’re a keen swimmer, then a trip to Grinda Island should be on the agenda. It’s popular with Stockholmers seeking sun and sea in the summer months and the local authority limits development to ensure it remains unspoilt. Whatever your interests, with so many islands to choose from, you certainly won’t be hard up for options.